How do you keep in touch with clients?

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In my previous blog post, I discussed how Tim Templeton in his book, The Referral of a Lifetime, suggested how to divide your database into categories (A, B, C, D) based on their likelihood of referring people to you. To move people from one level to another (from B to A for example), you will want to keep in touch with them. Invest time and money on this group. This is well worth it. They will want to refer you to people in their world. People believe what others say about you more than what you might say yourself.

Templeton suggested perhaps the owners of your company write to previous clients. Thank the person for his/her previous business. That owner would then introduce you as someone in his company (if you are one) they could call as well as himself to see if they had any questions or comments. You state your associate will call in a few days to check in with them.

In a few days, you call and have a warmer call. Also, ask if you could follow-up with them periodically just to see how they are progressing, share some valuable articles and see if there was any way at all you could help them reach their goals. This ended up as a successful way to generate more referrals without even asking. It’s about relationships.

It’s suggested that you develop a follow-up program. Use a program like Infusion Soft, to automatically send out articles, and items of interest you develop for your database. You might also use “Send Out Cards” which is a reasonable way to keep in touch with a group of people rather inexpensively.

What ways do you use to keep in touch with special people personally and professionally?

Please write your comments below.  I will respond.

Is your database organized for successful referrals?

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In my blog of Feb. 3, I discussed your ideal clients. As promised, here is additional information on how to identify them more easily. The Referrals of a Lifetime, authors Timothy L. Templeton & Ken Blanchard talk about organizing your database to identify your ideal clients. Here’s how it’s done:

Go through your database and assign a letter to each client which easily identifies how often you should contact them.

A’s – These are people who are your cheerleaders. They speak highly of you. They have exceptional regard for your abilities and would refer you right now. This includes family and friends not listed in your database. Your staff might know some too. They probably account for about 10 to 12 percent of the people you are acquainted currently with.

B’s – These are people whom you think are your champions and would refer you if you educated them about how you work. You will want to learn more about them too; be proactive in building an even better relationship with them. If you keep in good contact with them, many will become A’s. This group is harder to identify. It is composed of about 17 to 20 percent of those you know.

C’s – These are the people you are not sure about but still want to communicate with. You might have just met them or spoke with them briefly when introduced or exchanged business cards. They said it was fine for you to contact them. You are not sure they will refer you even after they are educated about you. You are hoping they will, however.

D’s- This is the delete or defer group. Here are the people you should not waste time on. These are people who take a lot of free services but are not serious about becoming your customer. They have no value to you and may, in fact, tarnish your reputation when speaking about you to others.

If you have read this book and applied these principles, I’d like to hear from you. Did this yield positive results? An increase in revenue? If you feel you need additional guidance in implementing this strategy, let’s talk.